John carpenter’s most underrated sci-fi film ‘prince of darkness’ (1987)

In retrospection, perhaps the critics who dismissed John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness in ’87 will recognize the film for what it’s worth – an inventive horror film conjoining lucifer with science and the church. John Carpenter wrote and directed this tale about Satan being sealed and confined in the crypt of a prayer house. For all intents and purposes, the fallen angel is depicted as a massive green lava lamp. The science of Matter, anti-Matter, Physics and Atomic Theory are relevant to its greenish-goo portrayal; described in accurate detail throughout the film’s dialogue.

Universal | 1987

Reverting back to a low budget of $3m and maintaining maximum artistic power, John Carpenter directed Prince of Darkness after a slew of major studio pictures like Big Trouble in Little China (1986), Escape from New York (1981), Christine (1983), The Thing (1982). This places emphasis on Prince of Darkness; it’s often the smaller films of a director that reveal their truest essence as filmmakers. Prince of Darkness is a slow-burn horror about scientists who unearth an antiquated cylinder in a forsaken house of worship. When the vessel is opened, it releases a fluid that transfers evil onto mankind.

Universal | 1987

Prince of Darkness is an underrated mash-up set within the confines of an abandoned church; the dark and light illustrated in the film is a testament to the love and/or fear evoked by reading sacred scripture. The film conveys an apocalyptic atmosphere, virtually indistinguishable to the day of resurrection, or the end times. The descriptive dialogue calls for examination; Prince of Darkness is an intellectual piece of cinema, as opposed to mere entertainment. The intellectual combination of science and malevolence is led by a Catholic Priest and a Philosophy Professor who attempt to stop the anti-Christ, with the grace of God. “Our logic collapses on a subatomic level, into ghosts and shadows.”

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